Executive interracial dating for marriage


By Wendy Wang This report analyzes the demographic and economic characteristics of newlyweds who marry spouses of a different race or ethnicity, and compares the traits of those who “marry out” with those who “marry in.” The newlywed pairs are grouped by the race and ethnicity of the husband and wife, and are compared in terms of earnings, education, age of spouse, region of residence and other characteristics.

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Same-race preferences for a partner are almost completely driven by the preferences of women, regardless of race.

Black women appear to have a stronger same-race preference than anyone else.

For example, a participant from a low-tolerance state such as South Carolina (where 28% of those surveyed feel that interracial marriage should be banned) has same-race preferences that are 16% points higher than participant from a state such as New York (where 22% feel that interracial marriage should be banned). are the lowest in the country; in 2007 only 33% of black women were married.

Also, familiarly with a particular race does not increase an individual’s willingness to date someone of that race, the greater the share of the home population that is that race the less a participant was willing to date them. This marriage-gap has been explained by high incarceration rates among black men, reducing their income and marriage prospects for the future, and the growing divide in education rates between black women and black men.

For example, an online dating Web site filter might ask the question “Which of the following races would be willing to communicate with?